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  •  

    THE ELECTRONIC ALADDIN NEWSLETTER NO. 29

    June/October 2001

     


    1. 2002 BEAMTIME SCHEDULE POSTED

    The beamtime schedule for the first half of 2002 is posted on the SRC Web site at:

    http://www.src.wisc.edu/facilities/beamlines/schedule/Beamtime_2002_part1.pdf


    2. SRI 2001 HIGHLIGHTS

    The SRC hosted the 2001 Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation conference. It was preceded by a workshop on Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) and followed by a workshop on Beam Stability Issues. Attendance at the main conference was 211 from 14 countries.

    The key words for this conference were fast (femtosecond time resolution) and small (nanometer source images). The most prominent scientific areas were biology and magnetic properties. The conference emphasized the use of synchrotron radiation in science and technology, representing a continuing trend from pure instrumentation to potential applications. Pictures can be found at: http://www.src.wisc.edu/SRI2001/Slide_Show/index.html


    3. USERS MEETING REPORT

    The annual SRC Users Meeting on Oct. 12/13 featured talks on a wide variety of topics, ranging from exotic electrons in solids that violate time reversal symmetry to the oldest rocks on Earth. The Aladdin Lamp Award went to Tim Kidd (see item 5), the Best Poster Award to Christian Ast for his work with Hartmut Hochst on the Fermi Surface of Bismuth (111), which made it onto the cover of Phys. Rev. Letters (Vol. 87, p. 177602, 2001). A booklet with details is posted at the SRC web site: http://www.src.wisc.edu/usermeeting/book_of_abstracts.html Pictures can be found at: http://www.src.wisc.edu/usermeeting/pictures/index.html

     


    4. CHANGES IN THE SRC TEAM

    Joe Bisognano is the new Executive Director of the SRC, succeeding Jim Taylor, who retired on July 1, 2001. Joe came to the SRC in 1999 as Associate Director for Accelerator Development after heading the Beam Physics and Instrumentation Department at Jefferson Lab.

    Walt Trzeciak, long-time leader of the accelerator group at the SRC retired on August 1, 2001. His successor is Ken Jacobs, who was head of the Accelerator Division of the Bates Lab. at MIT.

    Bruce Neumann joined the SRC on August 1, 2001 as new Safety Manager. He gives the safety instruction to new users and can be contacted at bneumann@src.wisc.edu .

    Bob Legg is the new leader of the Operations Group since July 2001. He is an electrical engineer with many years experience in accelerators. He is the main interface for questions on the performance of Aladdin and can be reached at 608-877-2162.

    Kyle Altmann joined the SRC as postdoc in April 2001. He supports users of various end stations, such as the Scienta 200 spectrometer, the magnetic growth chamber, the MCD chamber, and the absorption chamber. He knows these instruments well from his thesis work.

    For details and pictures see p. 7-9 of the Users Meeting Booklet at: http://www.src.wisc.edu/usermeeting/booklet.pdf


    5. CONGRATULATIONS TO SRC RESEARCHERS

    Tim Kidd (Univ. Illinois Urbana-Champaign) received the 2001 Aladdin Lamp Award of the SRC. It recognizes excellence in synchrotron radiation research performed at the SRC as part of an educational program. In his thesis with Prof. T.-C. Chiang he worked on charge density waves. These are phenomena that become pronounced in the two-dimensional world of a surface.